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At the Kansai Expo: Word learning etc.

“Phonological structure, non-native phoneme discrimination, working memory, and word learning” (Silbert) is one of the articles I will discuss in my presentation at the Kansai Expo. This article is a study that shows the ability to discriminate phonemes predicts accuracy in word learning. From the conclusion: “the ability to discriminate a given non-native contrast predicts […]

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Reading involves the ability to pronounce words (silently in one’s head) quickly and accurately and to read unknown words by decoding them. In alphabetic languages like English, readers link the letters (written units that represent sounds, like c or ck) to the phonemes (sounds of a language, e.g., /k/). This happens in two ways. One […]

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Journal: Frontiers in Systems of Neuroscience: (2013)  doi: [10.3389/fnsys.2013.00090] Title: Learning, neural plasticity and sensitive periods: implications for language acquisition, music training and transfer across the lifespan Authors: White, Hutka, Williams Moreno This article is about brain plasticity. It examines how and why humans experience periods when learning is easier and quicker that during other […]

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The conclusion to an article I recently read states “the ability to discriminate non-native phonemes is crucial to word learning in a nonnative language.” Nothing new there. I’ve been saying that for years. The research has been there for years. It was an interesting article, however, involving over 100 native English speaking children and 9 […]

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Research has shown that phonemic awareness is the single strongest indicator of a child’s success at learning to read an alphabetic script. Strong phonemic awareness, when used to segment and blend sounds, helps children decode and understand what they are reading. Phonemic awareness allows readers to build another important element of reading: phonics. Phonics (the […]

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This post is about an article I recently read. It is titled: Phonemic Awareness and Reading Comprehension among Japanese Adult Learners of English. It was published in, Open Journal of Modern Linguistics, 4, in 2014 (http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/ojml.2014.44039). The authors are L. Yoshikawa and J. Yamashita.   The purpose of this study was to see whether phoneme […]

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Phonics, phonological awareness and phonemic awareness are often confused. While these terms are related, they’re not the same thing. Here’s a look at what they are and how they work together to get kids ready to read.   Phonological Awareness   Phonological awareness covers many skills. (One of them is phonemic awareness.) It isn’t based […]

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The connection between phonemic awareness and reading is well documented. (There is a list of articles on the topic below).   It is not clear which processes underlie this connection, so researchers are trying to figure it out. An article I recently read used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the speech processing mechanisms for common […]

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Speech perception – the ability to hear the sounds – influences future literacy outcomes in pre-schoolers. That is to say, the ability to recognize, manipulate, and decode phonemes – phonemic awareness (PA) – is critical for reading.   The title of this post and the above quote come from an article I recently read (below). […]

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Phonics is teaching readers to connect the sounds of spoken language to letters. This is NOT the same thing as phonemic awareness. The terms are not interchangeable.    Phonemic awareness (PA) is the ability to hear and manipulate the sounds in spoken words. It involves hearing language at the phonemic level.   Phonics involves the sounds and letters. […]

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