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Alan Miesch
Stories written by Alan Miesch
After years as a ‘professional dabbler’, Alan Miesch found himself drawn into teaching English to non-native English learners. He has experience in a wide range of milieus, both in the United States and Japan, teaching young children, teens, and adults. He is now the proprietor and sole teacher at a private English classroom in Numazu, Japan.

Some Final Thoughts — And Adventure Ahead!

I’ve said a good deal here in the past about using puzzles as language teaching and learning tools, but there are a few more points I think are worth making. Then, having addressed theoretical and philosophical considerations, I plan to focus on posting very specific and practical ideas for puzzles and games and other activities, […]

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Dear Readers, would you help me think about something? Pretty please?  This is something I have wondered about many times, and I would love to hear what others think about it, and how they might apply their insights in their teaching.    When I think of teaching, I think about how I can engage my […]

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Magic Dust for Learning: Intrinsic Motivation Imagine you’re a student and you’ve signed up for an elective class at your school, a class called Sudoku. Cool. Sudoku is a math puzzle, and puzzles are fun and math is important. But that’s all you know. You don’t know how sudoku problems work—only that it’s something about […]

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I don’t mean to fool, frustrate or fuzzle— But you are invited to complete this __________;  You don’t have to applaud or even say thanks—   Just pick up a pen and fill in the __________.    The last time in this blog, I talked about Scrambles—puzzles in which pieces have to be put in […]

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I used to love it when my mother made scrambled eggs for breakfast. And now scrambles are one of my favorite kinds of language puzzles to create for my students. A coincidence? I think not. You can take any language target you want the students to conquer, and cut it into manageable, manipulatable pieces. The […]

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Teaching English as a Puzzle: the Why and the How   In my first blog entry, I said that next time I would explain my view of the why and the how of a Language Puzzle approach to language teaching. Here it is. As you read this, you may agree or you may disagree. Either […]

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So there I was, having lunch with another teacher of English here in Japan. He was someone who had been more than generous in sharing his knowledge and the benefit of his experience (largely via the ETJ email lists), someone from whom I had learned a great deal, someone to whom to this day I […]

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